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Under the Dome’s Alexander Koch Talks Season 2 to The Nerdist

Written by Vaughan Grey   // June 25, 2014

alexander koch

Alexander Koch Talks Season 2 to The Nerdist

Alexander Koch Talks Season 2 to The Nerdist

 

One of the breakout characters of Under the  Dome last summer was then-unknown Alexander Koch‘s Junior Rennie. Of course, Junior is a much different character in the Stephen King novel, but Alexander Koch made him likable….somehow. Now that Under the Dome is returning for season two on June 30th, 2014 on CBS, expect more of the same. At this point, it is clear that Junior will not be among the killed characters in Under the Dome 2×01 Heads Will Roll, which was written by Stephen King. Here, Alexander Koch talks Under the  Dome season 2 to The Nerdist.

 

You can read the whole The Nerdist interview with Alexander Koch here. 

 

Read an Excerpt of Alexander Koch Talks Season 2 to The Nerdist Below!

NERDIST: Junior is a character with a great deal of malicious disconnect which could be a bit much for some viewers, but you’ve managed to make people not only sympathize with him, but empathize a bit. You kind of feel what he’s feeling, and you see that he’s just trying to hold on to his relationship a little bit. How did you approach that? What was that like for you?

ALEXANDER KOCH: Well, that was the big thing, is that he’s holding onto three different relationships. He’s trying to hold onto this relationship with his dad, he’s trying to hold onto Angie, and stuff with his mom. I think that’s where I really, really started. I was, like, what’s the central thing? Where, if Junior was living this perfect life, where was the timeline? Where did the timeline go wrong? And I think it was when his mother died, he kind of had this piece of him just missing, and he was living with his father, who is really not nurturing. He’s nurturing, but not in the way that the mother is. He was tough and “You have to be a man. You have to be like this.”

We have to keep up this facade of how the family is supposed to be; this white-picket fence, despite the fact that there is an obvious missing component in the whole thing. And reading the book, he would have conversations with his mother in his head, and I thought that was a really interesting notion, so I kind of attributed it a lot to connections with his mother. With Angie, he finds that same type of love that she gave him. When she’s leaving him, he’s trying to get that back any way he can, so he’s doing terrible things, in order to hold onto her as much, and having that love for her and trying to hold onto her and not letting loose.


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